Category Archives: Community

Where is Dylan Ratigan from MSNBC?

REMEMBER HIM?

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I was an occasional viewer and my husband was a big fan, but after he threw in the towel, anchoring his own show last June, Dylan Ratigan was nowhere to be found.  Recently, he reappeared on a hydroponic farm in southern California.  He has joined forces with a former Marine to build a hydroponic network and employ veterans.

I’m impressed!  In today’s media we have a 24 hour resource of ‘talk the talk” personalities who do nothing else.  This man left it all, and is putting his boots in the soil.  Talk alone cannot change this world.  Exchange of ideas is important, but we need leadership, those who can “walk the walk,” and Dylan Ratigan is leading by example.  More power to him!  Thanks Mr. Ratigan.

Read the article at:  Mother Nature Network

Cheap and Simple Hydroponics:

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Boston In Our Hearts

Image“It may be stroking the cat, pottering in the garden, praying, meditating, listening to music or simply gazing at the waves of an incoming sea, we do these things because we find them replenishing; just as a field benefits from lying fallow so we can benefit from periods of uninterrupted rest.  That part of ourselves which demands something more than fatuity and shallow sensationalism deserves our time and respect.”   The Spirit of Silence by John Lane

BEYOND TABLET, T.V. AND i-PHONE

Recently I’ve been reading, Uprising For The Earth, by Osprey Orielle Lake.  This is a wonderfully inspiring book, with a subtitle:  Reconnecting Culture With Nature.  It’s not so easy these days, as the two have grown apart.

I am fortunate to live on the Pacific North Coast of California, surrounded by rivers, ocean and woods, where my children were also raised.  Frequently though, I think about the issues that Lake brings up in these quotes:

“What happens to us, TO OUR CHILDREN, in our urban centers when we experience primarily the smells of industry, smog, petroleum and chemicals?  What happens to our native ears when left only with the sounds of cars, telephones, freeways and mechanization?  What happens when our hands and eyes rest only upon human made things?…….Our human experience is dependent upon what influences our daily lives, and we are only beginning to take into account the consequences of depriving our children of direct communion with  the Earth, and all the plant life and creatures.”

 Uprising For The Earth

I know that we can’t all run from our lives in the cities, and it’s no longer just our locale that keeps kids indoors.  City dwellers, or country folk, I would love to hear about your plans to compete this summer with your child/grandchild’s electronic tablet, i-Phone, and television.  Thank you in advance for sharing on “comments.”

FIND A FARMERS MARKET – SUPPORT LOCAL FARMS

Why is it important to support local farmers?

“The loss of small family farms has dramatically reduced our supply of safe, fresh, sustainably-grown foods; it has contributed to the economic and social disintegration of rural communities; and it is eliminating an important aspect of our national heritage. If we lose our family farmers, we’ll lose the diversity in our food supply, and what we eat will be dictated to us by a few large corporations.”
Go to:  Sustainable Table, to read entire article.

To find a Farmer’s Market in your area go to Local Harvest.   Put in your zip code and you’re on your way!
To find out what’s in season year round, go to:  Eat The Seasons

There is good news, however, in the same article above, “Over the last several years, there has been an explosion of interest in small family farms, local food, and the preservation of rural communities and their heritage. Chefs, food lovers, citizens, parents, activists, students and many others are coming together to rediscover the benefits of eating sustainably-raised, locally grown food.”

When you find a Farmers Market, take your grandchildren along.  Turn it into an event, or if possible, take them to a farm.  They will love it, and they need to know where their food comes from.

CHOICES AND THE CONSUMER CULTURE

The home and belongings of a nomadic Nigerian family.

Let’s think for a minute about how much “stuff” we own.  Have you ever taken a walk in your neighborhood and looked through an open garage door?   In a lot of garages, in America, we no longer have room for the cars.  We have become a collector society for a number of reasons, to include financial stability.  Instead of sharing a seldom used item we each went out and purchased one.  Think about camping gear, gardening tools, inflatable beds.  In our family, a few years ago, there were two rototillers and one at the neighbor’s, next door – consumer culture.   Independence also breeds this type of behavior, but times are changing.  We need to depend upon one another more these days, to save money, but also to make a lighter footprint upon the earth.

Last summer I came across an article in the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper that discussed the topic of borrowing items instead of buying everything we need.  The article stated that, “Social networking and smart phones have paved the way for people to share their stuff…….people who share information about themselves online are more likely to share their belongings.”

To read the full article in the San Francisco Chronicle, go to:
Buy it?  No, Borrow it!   The newspaper listed the following sources for access to borrowing, individually, or creating a group in your community:   Rentalic,   Neighborrow,        NeighborGoods,         Share Some Sugar,        Snap Goods   (This one has a guarantee).   Think about this lifestyle choice, the world won’t change until we do.

After years of maintaining all the “stuff” we own,  the simplicity in the image above, does have my attention.